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Black Titan

Today I tell you about a book received thanks to the site lecteurs.com, black Titan of Florence Aubry, a beautiful novel that caught me to no longer let go.

Before I even started reading, I was pretty sure I was going to like this book. When I criticized novels for the literary magazine Youth Comma, I received quite a few books from editions of the Rouergue, and I loved them all.

Black Titan was announcing itself as a shock book, inspired by a true story about the Calvary of cetaceans in captivity, and I was not disappointed.

Summary:

After graduating, Elfie found a job as a cashier in an oceanographic park. She quickly climbed the ladder and soon found herself a killer whaler, especially Titan, the great Black killer whale. But the beautiful man-animal friendship that Elfie had imagined takes on an increasingly dark turn as she learns the truth about the agony of the cetaceans she is responsible for. Torn between the desire for mutual trust between her and the Orc, and the evidence that is piling up against the living conditions of Titan, between his enthusiasm and the wrath of the "Demonstrators of the roundabout", Elfie will have to face reality, even when This one is not pleasant to look at…

This book is separated in two, in a way more than visible, even before you start reading. There are the pages narrated by Elfie, black on white, as with all books; Then to this white comes to interpose the dark pages of a narrator whose identity remains unknown until the end, printed white on black.

This particularity warns us well of the course of the story: it is not a beautiful story where the animal becomes the best friend of the Gentile humans. It is a book that asks questions, which forces us to look anew at the clichés that one might have about cetaceans. And then, this particular detail intrigued me before I even started reading. I like the books of course for the stories, for the characters, but also for the book as an object, and this specificity immediately pleased me.

I loved this book, I devoured it in just a few hours, so much it is taking. From the very first pages, the mysterious narrator of the black pages calls us, tells us about this killer whale, of which we do not yet know the history, and which yet will follow us throughout our reading. This killer whale whose suffering and anger overflow the pages to invade the whole plot.

"He will never be friends with one of us, even if it used to be. And why? Because long ago he knows who we are, he knows exactly who and how we are, and the evil that we are able to do to him. There is no limit to the pain that we can inflict on him. »

From the point of view of Elfie, we witness his slow discovery of the truth, we see his enthusiasm cracking doubts. Florence Aubry has managed to create a heavy atmosphere that yet never becomes too heavy, its fluid writing has driven me without I see time passing. Simply written, but direct, Black Titan is one of those books that you get dizzy. E, the vibrating head of questions.

It is always hard enough to explain why we liked a book, so I would simply say that this book has touched me a lot. All the characters, including Titan, are full of emotions, emotions that I found just by rereading the first chapter before writing this column. They are complete, all in their own way, brimming with humanity.

"She thought she was doing him good. She thought that she brought him tenderness, comfort, in the brutal world of incarceration. But the truth is that she added brutality to brutality, because all this sweetness is falsehood, pure falsehood. »

It's a book that takes you to guts and stays with you long, at least, that's the effect it has made me! I am so keen to watch Blackfish, the documentary that inspired this story to the author.

Black Titan is an emotionally hard, but necessary, and more important reading because, even today, cetaceans are being abused in oceanographic parks, and deprived of the most basic thing: freedom.

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